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List of civil rights-era cases remaining open, according to Justice Department – Update of Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act (Cold Case Initiative)

The gravesite of Louis Allen, killed in Mississippi, Jan. 31, 1964

 

Heading the list of civil rights-era cases remaining officially open by the U.S. Dept. of Justice is the murder of Mississippian Louis Allen, who was killed on Jan. 31, 1964.

Under its “Cold Case Initiative” and the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act, the Justice Department has selected such deaths that occurred during the civil rights era to review for possible prosecution.

For most of the 124 deaths re-examined, investigators issued findings that no further action could be taken, but has also listed some 39 cases to remain officially open, including the Allen murder.

Squeaky Wheel

Family members of Allen, a Liberty resident shot to death 43 years ago in have offered $20,000 for information leading to the arrest of his killers.

Allen’s namesake grandson, Louis Allen Jr., said family members suspect the killer is alive and that other people were involved.

The Allen case has been one of more than 100 civil rights-era slaying under investigation by the Department of Justice. Louis Allen Jr. said he hopes the reward offered by the Mississippi Religious Leadership Conference will spark more interest in finding justice for his grandfather.

Efforts to solve the case gained steam, following prosecutions in other civil rights-era cold cases, including two life sentences handed down this summer to James Ford Seale of Roxie in the May 2, 1964, kidnapping of Henry Hezekiah Dee and Charles Eddie Moore. The teens were beaten and drowned.

(The Allen family has reportedly not been pleased with the FBI’s lack of progress on the case, a family spokesman once told me.)

Meanwhile, others remaining on the Open List are

2. Frank Andrews , Lisman, Ala., murdered Nov. 28, 1964.

3. Isadore Banks, Marion, Ark. — June 8, 1964.

4. Benjamin Brown , Jackson, Miss. — May 11, 1967.

5. Carrie Brumfield, Franklinton, La. — Sept. 12, 1967.

6. Johnnie Mae Chappell, Jacksonville, Fla. — March 23, 1964.

7. James Chaney, Philadelphia, Miss. — June 21, 1964.

8. George Dorsey, Monroe, Ga. — July 25, 1946.

9. Mae Dorsey, Monroe, Ga. — July 25, 1946.

10. Joseph Edwards, Vidalia, Miss. — July 12, 1964.

11. Willie Edwards, Montgomery, Ala. — Jan. 23, 1957.

12. Andrew Goodman,  Philadelphia, Miss. — June 21, 1964.

13. Mattie Greene, Ringgold, Ga. — May 20, 1965.

14. Jimmie Lee Griffin,  Sturgis, Miss. — Sept. 24, 1965.

15. Paul Guihard,  Oxford, Miss. — Sept. 30, 1962.

16. A.C. Hall,  Macon, Ga. — Oct. 11, 1962.

17. Rogers Hamilton, Lowndes County, Ala. — Oct. 22, 1957.

18. Samuel Hammond,  Orangeburg, S.C. — Feb. 8, 1968.

19. Isaiah Henry, Greensburg, La. — July 28, 1954.

20. Wharlest Jackson, Natchez, Miss. — Feb. 27, 1967.

21. Dorothy Malcom,  Monroe, Ga. — July 25, 1946.

22. Roger Malcom, Monroe, Ga. — July 25, 1946.

23. Delano Middleton, Orangeburg, S.C. — Feb. 8, 1968.

24. Booker T. Mixon, Clarksdale, Miss. — Sept. 12, 1959.

25. Oneal Moore, Varnado, La. — June 2, 1965.

26. William Moore, Attalla, Ala. — April 23, 1963.

27. Frank Morris, Ferriday, La. — Dec. 10, 1964.

28. Claude Neal, Greenwood, Fla. — Oct. 26, 1934.

29. Samuel O’Quinn,  Centreville, Miss. — Aug. 14, 1959.

30. Mack Charles Parker, Pearl River County, Miss. — May 4, 1959.

31. Jimmy Powell, New York, N.Y. — July 16, 1964.

32. William Roy Prather,  Corinth, Miss. — Oct. 31, 1959.

33. Johnny Queen, Fayette, Miss. — Aug. 8, 1965.

34. Fred Robinson, Edisto Island, S.C. — Aug. 5, 1960.

35. Willie Joe Sanford, Hawkinsville, Ga. — March 1, 1957.

36. Michael Schwerner, Philadelphia, Miss. — June 21, 1964.

37. Marshall Scott, New Orleans — January 1965.

38. Henry Smith, Orangeburg, S.C. — Feb. 8, 1968.

39. Clifton Walker, Woodville, Miss. — Feb. 29, 1964.
* * * * *

Some related Sovereignty Commission files on Allen can be viewed on my separate blog (Click Here).

But for now,  it is a shame that Justice has not taken time to examine the murders of Birdia Keglar and Adlena Hamlett. I will be discussing their murders and the murders of the 39 people listed in this newest report over the next few weeks.

Susan