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Black History Month: Emmett Till documentarian, Keith Beauchamp, has more surprises in store

Keith Beauchamp, left, interviewing Johnny Holcomb, a retired state police investigator in Louisiana, in “The Ghosts of Bogalusa” episode of “The Injustice Files.” (Photo, Investigation Discovery)

From The New York Times:

Better known for crime fare like “I (Almost) Got Away With It” and “Deadly Women,” Investigation Discovery is using Black History Month to turn the spotlight on three unsolved, racially motivated killings of the 1960s. For Keith Beauchamp, the 39-year-old documentary filmmaker who is an executive producer of the series and its host, it is familiar terrain. He’s been involved with these cases for years, since starting the 2005 documentary “The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till,” about a 14-year-old who was tortured and murdered in Mississippi in 1955 for supposedly whistling at a white woman.

Information uncovered by Mr. Beauchamp, as well as by the filmmaker Stanley Nelson (working on his own 2003 film, “The Murder of Emmett Till”) led to the reopening of that case.

***Honestly, if it were not for the dedicated work of young, aggressive Keith Beauchamp, we would know very little of the critical story of young Emmett Till who was killed in the Mississippi Delta, back in the summer of 1955. Keith has spent his professional life tracking down this story as well as what happened to so many others who were killed in those horrid times.

Mississippi’s Gov. Haley Barbour, the man who wants to be President, may not have been “paying much attention” to what what going on back then (as he has since stated) but he could make up for much of his ignorance by following Beauchamp’s work.

Yes, others have been researching and writing about these events, but most have been led by Keith’s early and critical work on the subject. Information uncovered by Mr. Beauchamp led to the FBI’s reopening of that case. From my own experience working with Keith, he always answers questions and attempts to help in any way. He is a true historian of critical U.S. civil rights history and I am proud to know him.

Please pass on this link to others TODAY! And if you get the opportunity, thank Keith Beauchamp for his dedicated work. He is shaping history.

Link to full story on Kevin Beauchamp, Emmett Till and civil rights cold cases documentarian.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/16/arts/television/16civilrights.html?_r=1&src=twrhp

Susan —